Difference between revisions of "Unit"

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(it needs to access in a uses statement)
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Units were also used on older versions of Pascal when it was nececessary on computers with limited resources to be able to load routines as needed rather than keeping every routine of the [[Executable program|executable program]] in memory all of the time.
 
Units were also used on older versions of Pascal when it was nececessary on computers with limited resources to be able to load routines as needed rather than keeping every routine of the [[Executable program|executable program]] in memory all of the time.
  
A unit that needs to access procedures and data types in another unit must specify those units it needs to access in a [[uses]] statement but linking is done without the need to write a makefile as in C.
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A unit that needs to access procedures and data types in another unit must specify those units it needs to access in a [[Uses]] statement but linking is done without the need to write a makefile as in C.
  
 
A unit may also be used to declare a series of global constants or variables for use by the entire application, without actually containing any executable code.
 
A unit may also be used to declare a series of global constants or variables for use by the entire application, without actually containing any executable code.

Revision as of 11:54, 13 February 2007

A unit is a source code file (or the binary compiled from that file) which was written using the Pascal programming language, and that is designed to be a single module in an application or an object module.

A unit may be used where certain functionality is to be provided to an application program or to other units, and allowing code that performs that functionality to be created once and used in many places. This can reduce the possibility of error and increase the possibility of code reuse.

A unit may be used where a program author wishes to provide certain functionality for use in a Pascal program but does not wish to provide the source code that performs that functionality.

Units were also used on older versions of Pascal when it was nececessary on computers with limited resources to be able to load routines as needed rather than keeping every routine of the executable program in memory all of the time.

A unit that needs to access procedures and data types in another unit must specify those units it needs to access in a Uses statement but linking is done without the need to write a makefile as in C.

A unit may also be used to declare a series of global constants or variables for use by the entire application, without actually containing any executable code.